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ancientart:

Howling Dog Effigy, Jalisco, 300 BC-AD 200. 
Why were dogs so significant to the Mexica?
Dogs were associated with the god of death, Xolotl, among the Mexicas of the highlands of Mexico. Both a dog and Xolotl were thought to lead the soul to the underworld. The skinny body and white hue of the shown dog represented above may have underworld connotations, connecting it to this belief. Xolotl was also associated by the Mexica with the planet Venus as the evening star, and was portrayed with a canine head.

The dog’s special relationship with humans is highlighted by a number of Colima dog effigies wearing humanoid masks. This curious effigy type has been interpreted as a shamanic transformation image or as a reference to the modern Huichol myth of the origin of the first wife, who was transformed from a dog into a human. However, recent scholarship suggests a new explanation of these sculptures as the depiction of the animal’s tonalli, its inner essence, which is made manifest by being given human form via the mask.
The use of the human face to make reference to an object’s or animal’s inner spirit is found in the artworks of many ancient cultures of the Americas, from the Inuit of Alaska and northern Canada to peoples in Argentina and Chile. (Walters)

On the subject of the significance of dogs, and dog effigies wearing humanoid masks, check out this post from a while back of ‘examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.’ The final artefact here is from Colima, and shows a dog wearing a human mask.
Courtesy of & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA, via their online collections, 2009.20.148.


Los perros de Colima

ancientart:

Howling Dog Effigy, Jalisco, 300 BC-AD 200. 

Why were dogs so significant to the Mexica?

Dogs were associated with the god of death, Xolotl, among the Mexicas of the highlands of Mexico. Both a dog and Xolotl were thought to lead the soul to the underworld. The skinny body and white hue of the shown dog represented above may have underworld connotations, connecting it to this belief. Xolotl was also associated by the Mexica with the planet Venus as the evening star, and was portrayed with a canine head.

The dog’s special relationship with humans is highlighted by a number of Colima dog effigies wearing humanoid masks. This curious effigy type has been interpreted as a shamanic transformation image or as a reference to the modern Huichol myth of the origin of the first wife, who was transformed from a dog into a human. However, recent scholarship suggests a new explanation of these sculptures as the depiction of the animal’s tonalli, its inner essence, which is made manifest by being given human form via the mask.

The use of the human face to make reference to an object’s or animal’s inner spirit is found in the artworks of many ancient cultures of the Americas, from the Inuit of Alaska and northern Canada to peoples in Argentina and Chile. (Walters)

On the subject of the significance of dogs, and dog effigies wearing humanoid masks, check out this post from a while back of ‘examples of dogs represented in ancient Mexican art.’ The final artefact here is from Colima, and shows a dog wearing a human mask.

Courtesy of & currently located at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA, via their online collections2009.20.148.

Los perros de Colima

(vía xlyoa)

oupacademic:

View of Toledo by El Greco.

El Greco cultivated other genres more rarely…. His two landscapes, View of Toledo (c. 1610; New York, Met.) and View and Plan of Toledo (Toledo, Casa & Mus. El Greco), are also late works of c. 1610. In these El Greco is preoccupied with the means of representing what is perceived as well as an emblematic sense of the urban landscape and a zenithal projection of the city, a combination that was advanced in the representation of urban topography. It is possible that in Toledo and Madrid these works influenced interest in still-life and in landscape, genres that had, almost exclusively, been orientated towards a naturalistic type of formal structure.

From 'Greco, El [Theotokopoulos, Domenikos [Dominico; Dominikos; Menegos]]' in Grove Art Online on Oxford Art Online.
We’re examining inspiring landscapes this July on the Oxford Academic Tumblr. 
Image credit: View of Toledo. El Greco. c.1599. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City. Public domain via WikiArt.

Paisajes de El Greco

oupacademic:

View of Toledo by El Greco.

El Greco cultivated other genres more rarely…. His two landscapes, View of Toledo (c. 1610; New York, Met.) and View and Plan of Toledo (Toledo, Casa & Mus. El Greco), are also late works of c. 1610. In these El Greco is preoccupied with the means of representing what is perceived as well as an emblematic sense of the urban landscape and a zenithal projection of the city, a combination that was advanced in the representation of urban topography. It is possible that in Toledo and Madrid these works influenced interest in still-life and in landscape, genres that had, almost exclusively, been orientated towards a naturalistic type of formal structure.

From 'Greco, El [Theotokopoulos, Domenikos [Dominico; Dominikos; Menegos]]' in Grove Art Online on Oxford Art Online.

We’re examining inspiring landscapes this July on the Oxford Academic Tumblr. 

Image credit: View of Toledo. El Greco. c.1599. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City. Public domain via WikiArt.

Paisajes de El Greco

Archive en el Festival de Jazz de Montreal

bofransson:

Gloucester Mansion
Edward Hopper - 1924

bofransson:

Gloucester Mansion

Edward Hopper - 1924

(vía thesensualstarfish)

The Unknown History of Latino Lynchings

independentcreativeservices:

image

The following is a summary & analysis of Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review article, “Law of the Noose: A History of Latino Lynching” Richard Delgado.

SUMMARY

Delgado attempts to shed light on a largely unknown history of Latinos, particularly Mexican-Americans in the Southwest…

"…a corrected version of history helps the people better understand themselves. Americans, Mexicans, the fusion of the two, in addition to people of the world, would recognize a better sense of their true identity & culture. The exploration of such history can perhaps allow for analysis of current rates of depression, crime/incarceration, and socioeconomic status(es). If we, the people, want to understand ourselves, we need to know the truth".

Jonny Greenwood plays Steve Reich’s Electric Counterpoint @ Glastonbury 2014 

Neuroscientist Antonio Damasio Explains Emotions | MIT Technology Review

“We have social practices in relation to which we are in a situation much like that of the Greeks with slavery. We recognise arbitrary and brutal ways in which people are handled by society, ways that are conditioned, often, by no more than exposure to luck. We have the intellectual resources to regard the situations of these people, and the systems that allow these things, as unjust, but are uncertain whether to do so, partly because we have seen the corruption and collapse of supposedly alternative systems, partly because we have no settled opinion on the question … how far the existence of a worthwhile life for some people involves the imposition of suffering on others.”

—   Bernard Williams, Shame and Necessity (p. 125)

Ferronautas en México

Hidden Beached Whale Revealed in 17th-Century Dutch Painting

Oh, You never expect a whale!